Urban Land - header

Volunteer - What We Do Section Title

What We Do

Urban land - principles

Urban land - principles

Bringing conservation home

Sure we restore vast landscapes, but the greenspaces in our daily lives also need some love. We use the following restoration principles in our backyard: 

  • Conserve water — We collect rainwater, landscape with native plants, and don't irrigate.
  • Cultivate healthy living soils — We compost yard waste.
  • Provide and protect wildlife habitat and corridors — We've planted milkweed and other native plants to attract butterflies.
  • Serve core human needs — We use our backyard as a community gathering space.

Urban land - what we do (text)

Not everyone has the time or flexibility to join us in the field, so we host workshops and workdays to get more students, volunteers, and community members involved in conservation.

Restoration in progress

Urban land - what we do (text 2)

Now that most of the back-breaking work of moving rocks, digging holes, planting trees, and building features is complete, we've started to incorporate food production into our backyard sanctuary. Local high school students are using the space to illustrate and test different ways of growing food in cities, including raised beds, food forests, and ground plots.

Urban land - why care

Why care about urban land stewardship?

Incorporating land stewardship into our everyday lives is a way for us to conserve scarce resources, like water, lessen our carbon impact, and create desirable places for people to live, work, and play. 

Urban land - CTA

Join the backyard fun!

Volunteers in Action Blog

04/19/18

North of the Grand Canyon, barbed wire fences stop North America's fastest land animal in its tracks. We're changing that.

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04/1/18

We're still looking for a few volunteers to help us protect native species on the Colorado Plateau.

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03/23/18

From Flagstaff to the Pacific Ocean, our former interns are pursuing their studies and embarking on a variety of meaningful careers.

Read More
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