Bears Ears - header
Tim Peterson

NM - legal update (header)

Legal Update

Bears Ears - Legal update (text)

The president's proclamations are a profound display of disrespect toward Indigenous people, and we believe he lacks the authority under the Antiquities Act to unravel our national monuments. Following the five tribes, we filed a lawsuit alongside other conservation groups and outdoor businesses. We're bracing for a lengthy court battle over Trump’s monument boundaries for years to come.

Bears Ears - Restore Bears Ears and Grand Staircase Petition

Restore Bears Ears National Monument

Lands stripped of protection

Tim Peterson
Tim Peterson
Tim Peterson
Jonathan Bailey
Tim Peterson
Jonathan Bailey
Tim Peterson
Jonathan Bailey

Bears Ears - what you can do

Bears Ears - what you can do
Ed Moss

What you can do

Bears Ears is a cultural landscape, home to Indigenous people since time immemorial. Now, it's threatened by drilling, mining, and irresponsible recreation. Urge decision-makers to restore and expand the monument and to incorporate Indigenous traditional knowledge and Indigenous science into monument management.

Sign the petition ›

What's at risk

What's at risk

Bears Ears - what's at risk (text)

The original Bears Ears National Monument encompassed some of our country’s finest cultural resources, spanning 12,000 years of human history, as well as fragile historic sites and yet-to-be studied fossil sites. Now fragmented into two units, the shrunken boundaries leave more than a million acres of previously protected land vulnerable to mining, drilling, and irresponsible off-road vehicle use.

Map of active mining claims in Bears Ears

Bears Ears - Estonia waste

Bears Ears - Estonia waste
Tim Peterson

Keeping radioactive waste out of Bears Ears

Radioactive waste produced in Estonia and Japan could soon be shipped around the globe to a uranium mill next to Bears Ears and on the doorstep of the White Mesa Ute community.

Ask Utah regulators to protect the Bears Ears region ›

Bears Ears - mining

Bears Ears - mining
Tim Peterson

Monument reductions about mining

What were the real motivations behind shrinking Bears Ears? Mining. Government documents show that oil, natural gas, coal, and uranium deposits were central to the president’s boundary revisions.

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Bears Ears - daneros

Bears Ears - daneros
Tim Peterson

Uranium mining near Bears Ears

The Daneros uranium mine lies three miles from the original boundaries of Bears Ears National Monument. Its owners are looking to expand the mine to more than 10 times its current size, increase uranium ore production by 400 percent, and extend the life of the mine by 13 years. We’re challenging the Bureau of Land Management’s decision to allow this expansion of the Daneros uranium mine without conducting an in-depth environmental review. More on the case ›

About Bears Ears

About Bears Ears
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Bears Ears - people

Bears Ears: A living landscape

Bears Ears is a landscape of stories — they’re etched in stone, sculpted in pottery, and cemented in cliff dwellings. They also live in the hearts of modern Indigenous people whose cultural connections have spanned across the region for millennia. We have a lot to learn. It’s time to listen.

Bears Ears - video

View Full Screen Story

Bears Ears National Monument is more than a collection of artifacts. It’s a living landscape of people and cultures woven into its canyons, mesas, and cliffs. At Bears Ears, the past meets the present, and the present meets the future.

People of Bears Ears

Blake McCord
Blake McCord
Blake McCord
Blake McCord

Bears Ears - unity

Unprecedented unity

In 2015, the Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition set aside their many differences and united to petition the Obama administration to protect public lands in southeastern Utah as Bears Ears National Monument. Led by the Hopi, Navajo, Ute, Ute Mountain Ute, and Zuni nations, and supported by more than 250 tribes across America, the coalition’s successful proposal marks the first Native-driven national monument campaign in history and acknowledges that tribes — and all Americans — have a shared responsibility to preserve this world treasure.

Bears Ears is a different kind of national monument — where Native American traditional knowledge is a value to be protected and a resource to be used in day-to-day land management. President Obama’s proclamation laid out a framework for an intertribal commission to inform how federal agencies manage the monument by incorporating Native American traditional knowledge and Western science. It's the strongest example of federal and intertribal collaborative management in American law. Read more about the historic designation ›

Bears Ears - polls

Bears Ears - polls
Tim Peterson

Americans love Bears Ears

Poll after poll shows that Americans love national monuments. During Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s monument review in 2017, more than 2.8 million people wrote comments in defense of Bears Ears. A sampling of all comments received through the government’s portal found that 98.2 percent of people “expressed support for national monument designations, while less than 2 percent expressed opposition to monument designations.” Bears Ears is so loved because it's a place where everyone has a story to tell. Take a look at one of them ›

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Ed Moss

Bears Ears - Explore on foot (CPE)

Explore Bears Ears on foot

Cedar Mesa, Comb Ridge, and the Abajo Mountains offer truly unparalled opportunities to hike into rugged canyons, see archaeological sites, and enjoy solitude. See for yourself why Bears Ears deserves protection ›

Bears Ears Blog

09/9/20

Why does the Japan Atomic Energy Agency want to send radioactive waste to Utah?

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07/1/20

From Arches to Canyonlands to Capitol Reef, what's on the auction block?

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06/11/20

The same uranium company that lobbied to shrink Bears Ears is seeking to import radioactive waste to Utah from Estonia.

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